Morning Song

“You are just like your dad! “ someone recently told my youngest.

(It sounded like this may have been said with a hint of sarcasm.) 😉

Sarcasm: the  use of irony to mock or convey contempt.

“What did he mean?”  I asked.

 

    “Well, some girl friends were wanting to go out  on the town, and all I wanted to do was stay home, wrap myself in a blanket, have some hot chocolate, maybe watch a good movie then go to bed.  I hadn’t had a nap…  I would much rather get up at the butt crack of dawn.   I have always been that way…  I am an early bird.”

 

The following flows from that conversation….

 

Morning song of  a house finch

I go to bed early.

Most nights

my sleep will be sweet.

 5 AM

I am ready to go.

I   head to the  kitchen,

grab two cups of coffee,

 bring them back to bed.

I like to  ease into the day.

Quiet conversation.

A psalm.

Check in with the Divine.

Help for the day….

Then I’m off.

My mate is not an early bird.

But neither is she a grumpy starling.

She is ….

Gentle.

Quiet.

But slower to stir

I am a finch.

house-finch

Male House Finch

_______________________

If you were a bird, what kind of bird would you be and why?

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20 thoughts on “Morning Song

  1. Love these words DM, as I too rise early and retire early. I am not a bird person per se, although I do like the songbirds and their voices. Many years ago I agreed to care for an African Grey parrot (long story as to why…) and the result was that the bird got out of it’s cage, flapped and waddled into the empty and cold fireplace and then as I attempted to ‘rescue’ it, it thanked me by attaching itself to and through my fingernail. I felt that was a rather ungrateful bird to say the least 😉

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  2. A very nice poem, DM. I was surprised by your description of the starling as “grumpy.” Around here, our starlings have the prettiest, most liquid song. I love listening to them, although it is true that the big flocks can leave a bit of a mess if they take up residence. Still, flocks of starlings and blackbirds are pretty amazing in their own way.

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    • The starlings that nest in the soffit of our old garage are, obnoxious, dirty, and prolific. Must be a rural Iowa thing 🙂 (yours sound much more refined.)!

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  3. I’m enjoying this conversation 🙂 But I’m not very knowledgeable about birds…
    As long as people are telling bird stories… Over the summer we kept our doors wide open a lot, not using A/C. One day I heard this rapid slight beating in the kitchen, walked in to find a hummingbird against the inside of the kitchen window. I was able to catch it as it was confused against the glass. It was so light and fragile! I folded its wings against itself so I could look at it a moment and then released it. I actually have a video of me releasing it; all you can hear is the tiniest little Harley you’ve ever heard start up and ride off as it beat it’s wings hard to get away from me.

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  4. I really like this illustration of you and Mrs DM, especially in light of what I’ve observed of house finches. One spring, I was treated to this scene just outside my kitchen window. A pair of finches flew in from the nearby birch tree. Mrs Finch lighted on the ground where she began to carefully sort through, then pick up wisps of grass. Mr Finch flew up to the overhanging gutter and proceeded to sing his heart out with that most melodious finch song. When Mrs Finch’s beak was full, she flew back to the birch tree, the site of that year’s nesting project, with Mr Finch closely following in winged formation. After a few moments, both flew back to the area outside my window, with Mrs collecting nesting material and Mr singing over her with what I can only imagine as praise, encouragement, or maybe simple delight in his quieter mate. Thanks to your “Morning Song” above, when I see a pair of finches this spring, I will have names for them 🙂

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